3 Often Overlooked Company Perks You’re Probably Not Negotiating

3 Often Overlooked Company Perks You’re Probably Not Negotiating

Congratulations. You’ve received an offer for that job you wanted. All those forms, assessments and rounds of interviews have paid off. While you may be tempted to open the champagne and relax until your start date, there’s still some work to do. It’s time to negotiate your package. Most successful candidates will attempt to negotiate a higher salary than was specified originally. However, many people do not realize that there are more benefits that may be available, if they just asked.

Here are three examples of company perks you might be missing out on.


Professional perks

You’re starting a new job, but you don’t want it to be the end of your professional development. When you’re negotiating your package, why not ask for a more important job title? Adding a ‘senior’ or ‘executive’ to your title may not make much difference to your day to day role. However, it looks better on your resume and on LinkedIn. It may also pay dividends when it’s time to move on.

Many companies offer to pay for training or education in your professional area. Some will even support you to postgraduate level. This benefits the company as it enhances your skills, but it benefits you more. If this is something you’re interested in, make sure you ask about it.


Wellbeing perks

A healthy employee is a happy, productive employee. That’s why many companies offer perks to make sure their staff are in top shape. Ask whether they’ll subsidize a gym membership, or pay for a bicycle so you can cycle to work.

Ask about perks that will improve your work-life balance. Flexible working hours, days you can work from home, or even extra vacation days. All these will help you juggle your new role with the other responsibilities in your life.


Travel perks

Moving to a new company usually means a new commute. Luckily many companies will be happy to help you with this transition. If you drive to work, ask about a fuel allowance or even about a company car. If you take public transport, ask about reimbursement for your fares, or a season ticket loan.

If you need to move house to be nearer to your new job ask your new employer if they will help with relocation expenses. This can be logistical such as hiring a removal company or something more hands on such as working with real estate agents to find you temporary accommodation. This will benefit the company in the long term, because if you’re nearer to the office, you’re likely to be more productive.


How?

If you want to attempt to negotiate your package in this way, firstly assess what perks are applicable to your role. For example, if you’re a nurse, there’s no point in asking if you can work from home. If you can, find out what perks people at comparable levels to yourself are receiving, within your new company and at their competitors. If, for example, you know that someone in the same role as you received a subsidized gym membership, it will help leverage your negotiating position. Then, just ask. Everything is negotiable. The worst that can happen is they’ll say no. Good luck.

Bio: Joe Flanagan is the Senior Consultant at Velvet Jobs outplacement services where he helps both candidates and employers with job matching, career and recruitment advice.

 

Joe Flanagan

Joe Flanagan is the Senior Consultant at Velvet Jobs outplacement services where he helps both candidates and employers with job matching, career and recruitment advice.